Terry Watts (sirterrywatts) wrote,
Terry Watts
sirterrywatts

Regent Honey-eater - Anthochaera phrygia

Today's bird is a Regent Honey-eater.

On a recent run of good luck, I was able to find the critically endangered bird North of Sydney, on the Central Coast. Although intensely hard to photograph, these birds are like a small child full of sugar. Literally swinging from the trees, and in this case scrub.

These birds are very similar to wattlebirds, and recent DNA testing has proved the link. Though nectar-feeding birds are quite common in Australia, more so than the rest of the world. It is thought that the regent honeyeater, was once feeling probably from wattle trees and slowly had to change to feed on other trees and food sources becoming a full-time honeyeater.

Today these birds struggle to keep up to the challenges of urbanisation, as with all birds that require mature trees and flowers to feed on. With rapidly changing climatic conditions and bushfires. It is no wonder these birds are critically endangered. Thankfully now there are large efforts to conserve both the habitat and the bird at present.

Tags: anthochaera phrygia, australian birds, evolution, regent honey-eater, wattle-bird
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